C-Band Under the Sea

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Using subsea cable connections, Confluence Network is preparing to enter the ocean to bring broadband off land. Based in Florida, the developer has plans to run underwater cable up the east coast from Jacksonville, Florida all the way up to New York City, reports CapacityMedia.com.

The Confluence-1 cable is designed to deliver 24 fiber pairs offering over 500Tbps of capacity. The expectation is that it will serve as both a high-quality extension and a more dynamic alternative to the U.S. land-based coastal network.

Engineering firm, MasTec, has partnered with Confluence, seeing the venture as an opportunity to claim a stake in the communications market. It has said that it sees the project as low risk and “fault tolerant.” It is unlikely that an undersea cable would be impacted by land-based disasters, and without local communities to enact zoning regulations and aesthetic concerns, construction should be able to proceed without incident. The timeline for the project expects it to be operable by 2023.

“We see Confluence-1 as an opportunity to make a game-changing addition to both the U.S. domestic network and the intercontinental network on the East Coast and look toward many more such opportunities as the global network evolves,” said CEO Paul Scott of Confluence Networks. He added, “We are fortunate to have MasTec as a partner in this enterprise, and excited to be working with them in realization of Confluence-1.”

“We are delighted to play a significant role in this important new development as now is the perfect time to focus on true redundancy,” agreed Jose Mas, chief executive officer at MasTec. “We look forward to a long and fruitful relationship with Confluence Networks, and to the future developments that will ensue as we deepen our involvement in the global communications community.” 

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