Crown Castle Supports Small Cells Order, Commits to Working With Munis

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UPDATE The uproar over the small cells order the FCC passed in September continues, yet Crown Castle steadfastly supports the changes. The rule, not slated to go into effect until January, caps what municipalities can charge to deploy a small cell in a public right-of-way to $270 per site. It also imposes time limits governing when localities must either approve or reject siting applications.

Ahead of the Wireless Infrastructure Association Foundation awards tonight, Crown Castle wanted to emphasize its support for the small cells order. “The FCC’s order to streamline small cell deployments will bring faster, more reliable wireless service to cities, create new economic opportunities for local communities, and ensure the U.S. is a world leader in 5G,” said Crown Castle President/CEO Jay Brown in a statement shared with Inside Towers.   

While commending FCC Commissioner Carr and Chairman Pai for their continued leadership on this issue, Brown added: “We look forward to the immediate positive impact the order will have on our upcoming small cell deployments across the U.S., and we are committed to partnering with municipalities to build communications infrastructure that will improve connectivity and foster innovation for residents and businesses.”   

More than 20 cities and counties are challenging the FCC’s new small cell deployment order in federal court. Sprint, AT&T and Puerto Rico Telephone Co. filed legal challenges to the FCC’s small cells order, saying it didn’t go far enough to help ease wireless infrastructure siting. Carr and San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo traded barbs about the issue last week on Twitter, Inside Towers reported.

During its inaugural Mobile Infrastructure Hall of Fame Ceremony tonight, several industry trailblazers will be honored, including former Crown Castle CEO John Kelly. Other inductees are: T-Mobile EVP/CTO Neville Ray, SBA Communications founder and former CEO Steven Bernstein, American Tower founder and former CEO Steve Dodge and MasTec CEO Jose Mas.

November 14, 2018

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